ETL401 – Topic 6: Time Management & Negotiation

Standard

3 ideas from the readings that are new to me:

  1. Setting up and using a library wiki is a great way to encourage collaboration between colleagues. I do know about wikis but this seems like a really great way to be able to collaborate in the virtual world (anywhere and anytime).  It provides another platform to talk about ideas and suggestions about best practices, problem solving and feeling a sense of connectedness within the library community. Of course, this may work better in a larger library, with more library staff (Gilman, 2007, Collaboration section, para. 3).
  2. The concept of the “80-20” rule (or Pareto Principle) (“Effective Time Management,” ca. 2013, Unperfect section, para. 1).
  3. Preparation is the the most important and helpful factor in regards to negotiation skills (Sanders, 2004, p. 129).

One thing I could do right now that would make me more productive in my work place:

The idea of making time to plan my day – everyday.  I believe that making a plan preferably the day before (maybe at the end of the working day) would be of great benefit to me. Taking that 10 minutes every day to organise my thoughts about what needs to be done the next day or that day would make me much more effective and hopefully spending less time and energy on those tasks that are less important right now. It sounds very attractive and achievable to be in control of my time and not allowing other people to decide how my time will be used……maybe far less exhausting! (“Effective Time Management,” ca. 2013, Second section, para. 2).

References

Effective time management for teachers. (ca. 2013). Retrieved from http://www.time-management-success.com/time-management-for-teachers.html

Gilman, T. (2007). The four habits of highly effective librarians. In The chronicles of higher education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/The-Four-Habits-of-Highly-E/46544/

Sanders, R. (2004). Conflict resolution. In Australian library supervision and management (2nd ed.) (pp. 127-132). Wagga Wagga, NSW: Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.

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